NG station Opening in Greensburg

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GREENSBURG — On July 7, Greensburg will join a growing list of Indiana cities that are installing public natural-gas fueling stations, that will be located near the Honda Manufacturing facility.

That station will be built by CNG Fuel, Inc. On Monday afternoon, CNG President Kris Kyler was the featured speaker at the weekly meeting of the Greensburg Rotary Club. Kyler was in town to promote the benefits of using natural gas (NG) and to explain why the Greensburg station is an important step in the current push to build as many NG stations around the state as possible and to convert or put as many vehicles on the road as possible that run on this fuel.

The NG initiative is being spearheaded by Indiana State Representative Randy Frye (R-Greensburg). Frye was on hand Monday afternoon to help supplement the information offered by Kyler.

In addition to being president of CNG, Kyler also owns and runs Indiana Geothermal, Inc., which, according to its website (indianageothermal.com), “provides geothermal products, custom system designs and earth loop installations.” The company, the site adds, works with various contractors to supply products and help design systems.

Kyler told the Rotarians that he got into the NG business almost by chance. Around 2007, after selling his previous business – Kyler Brothers Heating and Air Conditioning – Kyler founded Indiana Geothermal, and soon found himself spending excessive amounts of money to buy diesel fuel for his company fleet.

According to numbers Kyler presented Monday afternoon, in fact, he was spending between $15,000 and $18,000 monthly.

He found a solution in the use of NG to run his fleet. It’s significantly cheaper, he explained, and carries numerous other benefits. For one, NG vehicles meet all current clean-air standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Best of all, he continued, NG vehicles will also meet all future EPA standards. Additionally, semi-trucks that run on NG are significantly quieter compared to their diesel-chugging brethren.

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